Good Luck cards

Clinton’s new Chief Executive Dominique Schurman has spoken to Retail Week about her plans for the brand, following her appointment by new owners Lakeshore Lending, a subsidiary of Clinton’s largest creditor and supplier American Greetings.

Schurman has enjoyed a thirty year career in card and gift retail in the US, where she will continue to serve as CEO of Schurman Retail Group, which is part-owned by American Greetings, and comprises the Papyrus, Carlton and American Greetings shopfronts and online sites.

Adding 397 well-worn UK stores to this mix is a tall order, and Retail Week concentrates on three elements of her short-term strategy thus:

1. Renegotiate lease terms out of administration.  With retail chains falling like flies, landlords will be interested in reducing rents to secure tenancies, particularly in the sort of secondary mall locations that Clintons has historically filled – locations that are less attractive to fashion users.

2. Refurbish the stores.  The extent to which Clintons had allowed its estate to go to seed looks like a long-term death wish – either that, or simple disdain for customers and competitors.  The design of the typical Clintons store – inside and outside – has moved on very little since the 1980s, as the business became captive to its own heritage.  And maintenance has been poor: carpets are tatty, and fixtures and lighting well-worn and out-of-date, creating an ambience of “downmarket without the value-add”.  It is hard to see how you just freshen up these stores – they will need to be gutted and started again.

Schurman has indicated that she will drop the chain’s signature orange.  I’d think hard about the name, too; “Clinton Cards” has had out-dated connotations for a long time, and though it never quite shot itself in the foot (cf Gerald Ratner), it’s become a brand for which there is little consumer loyalty.  The store and online offer is going to have to be completely reinvented – why keep the old name, when you could do a Next-out-of-Hepworths, or River-Island-out-of-Chelsea-Girl, and properly reposition your business.

3.  Improve the product mix.  Clintons is another middle-market retailer that has fallen between the two stools of value (personified by Card Factory) and designer/quality (think Paperchase or Scribbler).

This is likely to mean a broader spread of gifts.  What does Schurman sell in her US businesses?

In addition to cards and stationery, upmarket brand Papyrus offers photo frames and albums, bags and purses, soaps, books and bookmarks, candles and diffusers, mugs, glasses and tableware, entertainment products, jewellery, scarves, journals, toys, games, plush and much more; Schurmann’s other brands provide mid-market ranges of similar products.

The US has a greater appetite for printed invitations and formal partyware than the more casual Brits, and this is reflected in the offer.  It also memorialises public holidays to a greater extent.  We do birthdays, Christmas, the spring seasons (Valentines, Mothers, Easter, Fathers), and a few personal milestones.  We don’t send a lot of cards celebrating Halloween or New Year, we’re disdainful of industry-created opportunities like Bosses’ Day, and – for instance – we express our patriotism rather differently to the US (did you receive any Diamond Jubilee cards?).  There’s no market for UK versions of the 4th July selection at American Greetings’ website, however keenly we support Help for Heroes.

Of course, it’s too easy to point up how we’re divided by a common language etc etc, but Schurman’s team will need to quickly recognise how different our attitude towards each other can be, and how this affects our preferences in cards and gifts.

All of the above will cost a lot of money, and a reinvention of this sort cannot be delivered overnight – American Greetings will have to run fast to deliver store prototypes and revised ranges for next Christmas.  And Schurman will of course have to address Clinton’s unexciting online offer, out-manoeuvred by Moonpig and prey to WH Smith’s new Funky Pigeon brand.

As a manufacturer and supplier, as well as retailer, AG will have to manager its supplier relationships with the supermarket chains, who are muttering about boycotting AG’s cards.  It would be counter-productive to save Clintons (at significant short-term cost) in order to lose long-term supermarket business.

Similarly, Clintons has important retailer relationships with AG’s direct competitors, like Hallmark.  Much triangulation will be required…

So, what’s the endgame? – a long-term presence as a retail owner in the UK, or a turnaround and exit in the course of the next five years?  While it’s good news that nearly 400 stores (and the jobs that go with them) have been saved, can profitability be grown at all of those locations?  And if you were setting out to build a 400 store chain, how many of these locations are the ones you’d choose?  This is not a quick-fix business.

Image: shirescentre.co.uk

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